To host a website on the internet, an individual or company would need their own computer or server.[7] As not all companies had the budget or expertise to do this, web hosting services began to offer to host users' websites on their own servers, without the client needing to own the necessary infrastructure required to operate the website. The owners of the websites, also called webmasters, would be able to create a website that would be hosted on the web hosting service's server and published to the web by the web hosting service.

When the Domain Name System was devised in the 1980s, the domain name space was divided into two main groups of domains.[7] The country code top-level domains (ccTLD) were primarily based on the two-character territory codes of ISO-3166 country abbreviations. In addition, a group of seven generic top-level domains (gTLD) was implemented which represented a set of categories of names and multi-organizations.[8] These were the domains gov, edu, com, mil, org, net, and int.

18. Host1PlusHost1Plus is a unified solution for VPS hosting, fast cloud storage, IPv4 & IPv6, and full DNS control. It comes with powerful API, KVM virtualization, and custom ISO for Windows and Linux users. The scalable architecture allows Host1Plus to follow your growing demands, and boost all necessary resources with both managed and unmanaged plans. All unmanaged plans are TUN/TAP/PPP enabled and come with SSD caching, 500 Mbps uplink, Virtuozzo & OpenVZ, backups, and RAID data storage for up to 32 IPv4 addresses. You can use Host1Plan to create your domain zones and edit records directly at your Client Area, and control several Linux OS instances (Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, CentOS, and Suse). You can also connect your virtual console to their emergency console to retrieve access to your server, and protect your data.
^ March 16, 1992 memo from Mariam Leder, NSF Assistant General Counsel to Steven Wolff, Division Director, NSF DNCRI (included at page 128 of Management of NSFNET, a transcript of the March 12, 1992 hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Hon. Rick Boucher, subcommittee chairman, presiding)
×