The practice of using a simple memorable abstraction of a host's numerical address on a computer network dates back to the ARPANET era, before the advent of today's commercial Internet. In the early network, each computer on the network retrieved the hosts file (host.txt) from a computer at SRI (now SRI International),[4][5] which mapped computer hostnames to numerical addresses. The rapid growth of the network made it impossible to maintain a centrally organized hostname registry and in 1983 the Domain Name System was introduced on the ARPANET and published by the Internet Engineering Task Force as RFC 882 and RFC 883.
An SSL connection encrypts the data that travels between your site and users' web browsers, thus safeguarding the transmission of purchasing information. All the WordPress hosting services in this roundup offer SSL certificates, but the prices vary from company to company. Some companies include a free SSL certificate when you sign up for a hosting plan, while others charge close to $100. 

It is very rare for a customer to exceed normal usage while managing a website. Typically, customers only experience issues if they use their accounts for storage (for example large multimedia files) or file sharing. Our hosting services are not intended to support these activities, and in accordance with our Terms of Service your disk space and bandwidth usage must be integrated into the normal operation of a website. We offer various plans that better address high bandwidth and large storage requirements. Please contact us for details.

If you're planning to create a WordPress-powered site, there's no reason not to invest in WordPress-specific hosting. It's chock full of benefits. That said, a WordPress environment won't allow you to set up a non-WordPress site—that's something else to keep in mind, especially if you have a site in mind that will rely on specific frameworks, for example. In such instances, you'll want to go build your site on shared hosting, VPS hosting, or dedicated hosting services. And, if you want to start your own web hosting company, reseller hosting is the way to go.
If you cancel within 30 days and your plan includes a free domain, Bluehost will deduct a non-refundable domain fee of $15.99 from your refund. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. You may transfer it to another registrar or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. Please note newly registered domains cannot be transferred to another registrar during the first 60 days of the registration period. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you renew it.
The aforementioned features are valuable to the web hosting experience, but none can match the importance of site uptime. If your site is down, clients or customers will be unable to find you or access your blog or your products or services. Potential new customers may miss your site altogether, and existing customers may go elsewhere out of frustration or confusion.

Well, you went over speed and pricing but what about security. Who has the best overall when security is figured in. I ask because one of the ones you have listed I am on and they didn’t catch the websites being hacked I have 17 websites with code in them, they didn’t catch. It looks like bitcoin mining to me. See I keep asking why my website was loading so slow and they keep saying it was because they were not optimized right. Now the same sites were loading in 1.6 seconds to 1.8. Now they were taking 6.5 to 8 and even 9 seconds to load. THey cost me a great deal of time and money over this and even my backups are junk. I add this also they never found the problem till I personally found the problem and pointed it out. Needless to say, I am done with them…
Domain names are created to make IP addresses easy to remember. Every computer has an IP address assigned to it - much like a street address. But instead of having to memorize each IP address number, we assign domain names to these numbers so we can easily remember them. The domain name system, or DNS, takes domain names and translates them into their IP addresses so that computers can communicate with one another.
Domain names are formed by the rules and procedures of the Domain Name System (DNS). Any name registered in the DNS is a domain name. Domain names are organized in subordinate levels (subdomains) of the DNS root domain, which is nameless. The first-level set of domain names are the top-level domains (TLDs), including the generic top-level domains (gTLDs), such as the prominent domains com, info, net, edu, and org, and the country code top-level domains (ccTLDs). Below these top-level domains in the DNS hierarchy are the second-level and third-level domain names that are typically open for reservation by end-users who wish to connect local area networks to the Internet, create other publicly accessible Internet resources or run web sites.
The practice of using a simple memorable abstraction of a host's numerical address on a computer network dates back to the ARPANET era, before the advent of today's commercial Internet. In the early network, each computer on the network retrieved the hosts file (host.txt) from a computer at SRI (now SRI International),[4][5] which mapped computer hostnames to numerical addresses. The rapid growth of the network made it impossible to maintain a centrally organized hostname registry and in 1983 the Domain Name System was introduced on the ARPANET and published by the Internet Engineering Task Force as RFC 882 and RFC 883.

Because we offer what is known as a shared architecture, our customers share both the hardware and the "pipes" we use to transmit data across the web, so we do monitor bandwidth to ensure optimum performance for our customers. Again, we are able to support more than 99.5% of customers with no issues at all. However, in some wonderful cases, customers become so successful that their traffic and data transfer outgrow our shared architecture. When that happens, we work with the customer to identify scalable solutions, such as our Virtual Private Servers.


A fictitious domain name is a domain name used in a work of fiction or popular culture to refer to a domain that does not actually exist, often with invalid or unofficial top-level domains such as ".web", a usage exactly analogous to the dummy 555 telephone number prefix used in film and other media. The canonical fictitious domain name is "example.com", specifically set aside by IANA in RFC 2606 for such use, along with the .example TLD.

Dedicated hosting is not for everyone and generally provides more resources than the average business requires. Dedicated hosting is ideal for very large companies that regularly experience a high volume of internet traffic or sales, or require a large amount of disk space. Dedicated hosting grants you the greatest flexibility, customization, and security of the three types of hosting but is also the most expensive.
We don’t limit the amount of visitor traffic a website can receive or the amount of content you can upload to your website so long as you comply with our Terms of Service. If your website demands resources that present a risk to the stability, performance, or uptime of our servers, we will notify you to take corrective action and may restrict the resources or ask you to choose a plan more suitable to your needs.

Name servers. Most registrars provide two or more name servers as part of the registration service. However, a registrant may specify its own authoritative name servers to host a domain's resource records. The registrar's policies govern the number of servers and the type of server information required. Some providers require a hostname and the corresponding IP address or just the hostname, which must be resolvable either in the new domain, or exist elsewhere. Based on traditional requirements (RFC 1034), typically a minimum of two servers is required. 
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